INQOVI (Mechanism of Action)

In this article, we will discuss INQOVI (Mechanism of Action). So, let’s get started.

Mechanism of Action

Decitabine is a nucleoside metabolic inhibitor that is believed to exert its effects after phosphorylation and direct incorporation into DNA and inhibition of DNA methyltransferase, causing hypomethylation of DNA and cellular differentiation and/or apoptosis. Decitabine inhibits DNA methylation in vitro, which is
achieved at concentrations that do not cause major suppression of DNA synthesis. Decitabine-induced hypomethylation in cancer cells may restore normal function to genes that are critical for the control of
cellular differentiation and proliferation. In rapidly dividing cells, the cytotoxicity of decitabine may also be attributed to the formation of covalent adducts between DNA methyltransferase and decitabine incorporated into DNA. Non-proliferating cells are relatively insensitive to decitabine.
Cytidine deaminase (CDA) is an enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of cytidine, including the cytidine analog decitabine. High levels of CDA in the gastrointestinal tract and liver degrade decitabine and limit its oral bioavailability. Cedazuridine is a CDA inhibitor. Administration of cedazuridine with decitabine increases systemic exposure of decitabine.

Pharmacodynamics

Decitabine induced hypomethylation both in vitro and in vivo. In patients administered the recommended dosage of INQOVI, the maximum change from baseline in the long interspersed nucleotide elements-1 (LINE-1) demethylation was observed at Day 8, with less than complete recovery of LINE-1 methylation to baseline at the end of the treatment cycle.

Based on the exposure-response analyses, a relationship between an increase in 5-day cumulative daily decitabine exposure and a greater likelihood of some adverse reactions (e.g., any grade neutropenias, thrombocytopenia) was observed in clinical studies.

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